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EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON RADISH SEEDS

by Judy Williams

 

PROBLEM: What effect will exposure to different time lengths of U-V radiation have on the germination of radish seeds and seedling growth?

HYPOTHESIS: (Educated guess to the problem based on background knowledge.)
Write your hypothesis below.

MATERIALS:
--plastic tray with lid
--marker for writing
--paper towel
--water
--graduated cylinder
--10 radish seeds (irradiated with U-V light for different lengths of time)
--tweezers

PROCEDURE:
  1. Write the length of time irradiated seeds were exposed to U-V light, the date, your initials, and your class period on the masking tape on the side of your plastic dish and also in this blank--________ .

  2. Take one piece of paper towel and fold it in half. Fold it in half again.

  3. Place the folded piece of paper towel in the bottom of the plastic dish.

  4. Pour 15 milliliters of water over the paper towel. All of the towel needs to be wet, but extra water should not be sitting in the bottom of the tray. If you need to add more water to thoroughly moisten the towel, measure and record the amount added in this space. _________ml.

  5. Use your tweezers and place 10 radish seeds on the paper towel in the plastic tray making two rows of seeds with five seeds in each row.

  6. Put the lid on the dish and be sure it is on tight!

  7. Put the plastic dish where you have been told to store it in the room. Be careful so the seeds don't move all over in the dish!

  8. Clean up and return all materials to their proper area.

OBSERVATIONS:
  1. Observe the radish seeds in your plastic dish daily for a "sprout" (emerging radicle) coming out of the seed. Did you know that seeds have germinated when they get these "sprouts"? Some of the "sprouts" might grow so fast that you can see the seed's stem and roots with tiny looking hairs.

  2. On the sixth day you are to COUNT the number of seeds that you can see the "sprout" (stem or roots) coming out of the seed--even if the sprout is very small. Don't count them if the outside coat of the seed has broken open but there is no "sprout."

  3. RECORD the number of seeds germinated in this space.___________

  4. MEASURE the combined stem and root length of each "sprout" with a metric ruler and record their lengths in millimeters in a table that you have constructed on your own paper.

  5. Clean up the lab materials following the directions of the teacher.

RESULTS:
(Analyze your raw data to help reach a conclusion to the problem.)
  1. How many seeds did you put in the tray at the beginning of the experiment?

  2. What percent of the seeds had germinated within six days?

  3. What was the average length in mm for each "sprout" in your tray?

  4. Make a "class table" to compare the data the percent of seed germination and average sprout length in mm for the different time lengths of exposure.

  5. Obtain graph paper from the teacher and....
    --Make a graph that compares the percent of seeds that germinated to the different time lengths of U-V radiation. Be sure to title the graph and include titles on the horizontal and vertical axes?
    --Make a graph that compares the average length of the sprouts to the different time lengths of U-V radiation. Be sure to title the graph and include titles on the horizontal and vertical axes?

REACH A CONCLUSION :
Review the analyzed class data. What do the graphs indicate? What effect did the exposure to different time lengths of U-V radiation have on seed germination and seedling growth? Write your conclusion below.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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