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Florida Science Standards

Host: Gail Tucker
Presenters: The AE Community
Discussion

My Activity:
What Do You Know? (More than you think!)

Use these state guidelines for science as a study guide--the items on this handout are the focus of life science in Florida. Your course content covers each of the required concepts at one time or another. Many of these concepts recur in the course and are repeated throughout the year.

Here's how to use this handout:

1. Refer to the Handout--How to Get A's--and focus on learning to use the study strategies presented there.
2. Refer to each of the state standards listed below.
3. For each standard think of one example of something you have learned in biology this term that reflects the objective of that standard.
4. Write down your example and see if you can explain how it demonstrates the concept described in the state standard.
5. Study your examples as you prepare for examinations. GOOD LUCK!

PROCESSES OF LIFE

Standard 1: The student describes patterns of structure and function in living things.


1. Knows that body processes involve specific biochemical reactions governed by biochemical principles.
Example:

2. Knows that body structures are uniquely designed and adapted for their function.
Example:

3. Knows that membranes are sites for chemical synthesis and essential energy conversions.
Example:

4. Understands that biological systems obey the same laws of conservation as physical systems.
Example:

5. Knows that complex interactions among the different kinds of molecules in the cell cause distincy cycles of activity governed by proteins.
Example:

6. Knows that parts of the body communicate with each other using electrical and/or chemical signals.
Example:

7. Knows that organisms respond to internal and external stimuli.
Example:

8. Knows that cell behavior can be affected by molecules from other parts of the organism or even from other organisms.
Example:

Standard 2: The student understands the process and importance of genetic diversity.

1. Understands the mechanisms of asexual and sexual reproduction and knows the different genetic advantages and disadvantages of each.
Example:

2. Knows that every cell contains a "blueprint" coded in DNA molecules that specify how proteins are assembled to regulate cells.
Example:

3. Understands the mechanisms of change (e.g., mutation and natural selection) that lead to adaptations in a species and their ability to survive naturally in changing conditions and to increase species diversity.
Example:

HOW LIVING THINGS INTERACT WITH THEIR ENVIRONMENT

Standard 1: The student understands the competitive, interdependent, cyclic nature of living things in the environment.


1. Knows the great diversity and interdependence of living things. Example:

2. Understands how the flow of energy through an ecosystem made up of producers, consumers, and decomposers carries out the processes of life and that some energy dissipates as heat and is not recycled.
Example:

3. Knows that the chemical elements that make up the molecules of living things are combined and recombined in different ways.
Example:

Standard 2: The student understands the consequences of using limited natural resources.


1. Knows that energy-rich deposits of organic materials have turned gradually into coal and oil (fossil fuels) by the pressure of the overlying earth, and that humans burn fossil fuels--releasing the energy as heat and carbon dioxide.
Example:

2. Knows that changes in one part of an ecosystem have unpredictable effects on the entire system, and that the components of the system react to restore the ecosystem to its original condition.
Example:

3. Understands how genetic variation contributes to population control and that natural selection assures that those who are best adapted to their surroundings will live to reproduce.
Example:

4. Knows that the world's ecosystems are shaped by physical factors that limit their productivity.
Example:

5. Understands that the amount of life any environment can support is limited and that human activities can change the flow of energy and reduce the fertility of the Earth.
Example:

6. Knows the ways in which humans are placing their environmental support systems at risk (population growth, environmental degradation, resource depletion).
Example:

THE NATURE OF SCIENCE

Standard 1: The student uses the scientific process and thinking to solve problems.


1. Knows that investigations are conducted to explore new phenomena, to check on previous results, to test how well a theory predicts, and to compare different theories.
Example:

2. Knows that sometimes major shifts occur in the scientific view of how the world works, but that more often the changes that take place in the body of scientific knowledge are small modifications of prior knowledge.
Example:

3. Understands that no matter how well one theory fits observations, others might fit as well or better, because in science, the testing, revising, and occasional discarding of theories is ongoing and may lead to better understanding of how things work if not to absolute truth.
Example: 4. Knows that scientists in any one research group tend to see things alike and that therefore scientists are trained to seek out the possible biases in the design of their investigations and in their data analyses. Example:

5. Understands that new ideas in science are limited by the context in which they are conceived, are often rejected by the scientific establishment, sometimes spring from unexpected findings, and usually grow slowly with many contributors.
Example:

6. Understands that new ideas often do not mesh well with mainstream science, and may encounter vigorous criticism, but that in the long run, theories are judged by how they fit with other theories, the range of observations they explain, how well they explain these observations and how effective they are in predicting new findings.
Example:

7. Understands the importance of a sense of responsibility, a commitment to peer review, truthful reporting of methods and outcomes of their investigations, and making the public aware of their findings.
Example:

Standard 2: The student understands that most natural events occur in comprehensible, consistent patterns.


1. Knows that scientists assume the universe is a vast system in which basic rules exist that may range from very simple to extremely complex, but that scientists operate on the belief that the rules can be discovered by careful, systemic study.
Example:

2. Knows that scientists control conditions in order to obtain evidence, but when that is not possible for practical or ethical reasons, they try to observe a wide range of natural occurrences to discern patterns.
Example:

Standard 3: The student understands that science, technology, and society are interwoven and interdependent.


1. Knows that performance testing is often conducted using small-scale models, computer simulations, or analogous systems to reduce the chance of system failure.
Example:

2. Knows that technology often creates a need for new knowledge and that new technologies make it possible for scientists to extend their research in ways that advance science.
Example:

3. Knows that scientists can bring information, insights and analytical skills to matters of public concern and help people understand the possible causes and effects of events.
Example: 4. Knows that funds for science research come from federal government agencies, industry and private foundations and that the funding source often influences the direction of the research. Example:

5. Knows that the value of a technology may differ for different people and at different times.
Example:

6. Knows that scientific knowledge is used by those who engage in design and technology to solve practical problems, taking human values and limitations into account.
Example:

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