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Comparison of passive and active transport

   Copyright 2004 by Alberts, Bray, Johnson, Lewis, Raff, Roberts, Walter.
Garland Publishing: Taylor Francis Group.

Comparison of passive and active transport


Solutes cross cell membranes by passive or active transport. If uncharged solutes are small enough, they can move down their concentration gradients directly across the lipid bilayer itself by simple diffusion. Examples of such solutes are ethanol, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. Most solutes, however, can cross the membrane only if there is a membrane transport protein (a carrier protein or a channel protein) to transfer them. As indicated, passive transport, in the same direction as a concentration gradient, occurs spontaneously, whereas transport against a concentration gradient (active transport) requires an input of energy. Only carrier proteins can carry out active transport, but both carrier proteins and channel proteins can carry out passive transport.  Fair Use and Copyright info

 
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